6 Ways to Deal with Naysayers and Crush Your Goals

Dr. Kevin Gazzara
4 min readMay 3, 2023
Photo by: Sol Vazquez

Introduction:

Achieving one’s goals can be challenging enough, but dealing with naysayers can make the journey even more difficult. Naysayers can cast doubt on one’s abilities and goals. However, there are several ways to manage naysayers and remain focused on achieving one’s goals. According to Dale Carnegie in his book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” putting distance between oneself and naysayers can help to avoid their negative influence. Continuously hearing their doubts and criticism can lead to self-doubt, making it challenging to move forward with one’s goals. If distancing oneself from the naysayers is not an option, having an honest conversation with them may help. As Daniel Goleman explains in his book “Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence,” politely explain that their discouragement is not welcome, and while their support is not required, their negativity is not helpful.

Strategy 1: Distance Yourself from the Negative

Putting distance between oneself and naysayers can help to avoid their negative influence. Continuously hearing their doubts and criticism can lead to self-doubt, making it challenging to move forward with one’s goals. If distancing oneself from naysayers is not an option, having an honest conversation with them may help. Politely explain that their discouragement is not welcome, and while their support is not required, their negativity is not helpful.

Strategy 2: Bolster Yourself with Support

Surrounding oneself with supportive individuals who believe in one’s goals can provide encouragement and reassurance. According to Adam Grant in his book “Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success,” supportive people can also provide help when times get tough, helping to maintain focus on one’s goals.

Strategy 3: No Justification Necessary

One does not need to justify their goals or the path they are taking to anyone. Each person is unique, and everyone’s journey is different. If someone questions one’s goals, a simple statement such as, “This is what I choose,” can suffice. As Sonja Lyubomirsky explains in her book “The How of Happiness: A Scientific Approach to Getting the Life You Want,” it is important to remember that everyone’s path to success…

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Dr. Kevin Gazzara

CEO of Magna Leadership Solutions, Certified Positive Intelligence Coach, Management Expert, Professor, Speaker, and Author. Contact: Kevin@Magnaleadership.com